Movie Review

IGE: THE REPERCUSSIONS OF SUPPORT

Our life, or something close enough before a screen is a clear reminder of our everyday life. A real life story revolving around Bashiru, from birth up to the important parts and peak of adulthood, portraying each stage with no important age bracket left behind.

The representation of the nollywood we are trying to forget comes back to knock on our screen. Produced by Toyin Abraham, The representation of the rich Yoruba culture in every part of the movie is commendable and beautiful.

The movie begins with Atoke, played by Toyin Abraham in labor and being rushed to the hospital, and after a prolonged delivery, gives birth to a child, unveiling scene by scene we watched the child grow and in no time began everyday life.  Taken to his uncle’s at the start of secondary school, the film goes on to show how Bashiru tried different handworks, together with education and finally fell in love with crude oil production and transportation.

Risky but well worth it as he caught the eye of Mrs Odeniyi, who asked him to manage her newly established filling station. He fell in love with her daughter, Bayo, played by Bimbo Ademoyr, Bashiru ended up being with her which cost him his job and reputation much later in the movie. He was accused of Cheating on her and later shifted to embezzlement which meant repaying the money and getting back to being jobless and broke. Leaving Bayo, he dated someone younger and got her pregnant.

Future scenes unveiled what the couple went through in the Pursuit for a better life briefly. From failed businesses to everything crashing, which pushed him back to his oil business, and gradually he climbed back up with a stroke of luck and miracle as his Oil business gradually boomed, he later opened a filling station and ended the movie with a happy and befitting wedding  for the bride of his youth.

The film, a real life story, produced by Toyin Abraham and directed by Biodun Stephen was not duly represented. The casting seemed poorly selected, though most likely gave their all, we could all notice minimal efforts and how poorly each role was represented. The feelings and emotions the actors should bring to life were not present, making the movie generally unrelatable and feeling a little unreal.

Being a true life story, we would be expecting it to  portray scene after scene, the everyday life of who they were representing, but no, we only watched a boy growing from childhood to adulthood with no spice and fun. Waheed, skillfully portrayed by Kola Ajeyemi was quite the commendable cast and did a great job in representing his role optimally. Generally, the cast did a poor job.

Six characters playing Bashiru at different age brackets made the character lose its feel and essence, how one second I’m feeling this passionate young man playing the lead character and in the second, I see someone else, quite disengaging.

The movie cinematography was poor, lots of jumping and poorly arranged scenes put together gave us this. The movie had lots of jumps making it generally boring. Imagine a scene where I’m beginning to understand why Young Bashiru decides to opt for his uncle’s business and in the next, we see him making inquiries about crude oil. Or how we were left in the dark with the knowledge of how Bayo reacted to her mother’s failed pla sn of getting him back. Truly disconcerting. The time lapse also would have been helpful as the film progressed. Also a few interesting action or unforgettable random childhood scenes in between his growth stages would have made it all the more interesting but sadly these were missing.

Attempting to portray the effects of support and determination, the movie only did that. It failed to properly express it. Because at many points in the film, I was convincing myself that they are simply telling a story. A stroke of luck hit him and boom, everything went so fast, it was a kind reminder why we must push and the need for a supportive partner at every turn. They generally make the journey easier and shorter no matter how exhausting it might be. The movie is rated a 2.5. it lacked depth and spice that would make it memorable, for a real life experience, it more of gave us the feel of a poorly written script instead of the story of a young man who went from grass to grace.

Our life, or something close enough before a screen is a clear reminder of our everyday life. A real life story revolving around Bashiru, from birth up to the important parts and peak of adulthood, portraying each stage with no important age bracket left behind.

The representation of the nollywood we are trying to forget comes back to knock on our screen. Produced by Toyin Abraham, The representation of the rich Yoruba culture in every part of the movie is commendable and beautiful.

The movie begins with Atoke, played by Toyin Abraham in labor and being rushed to the hospital, and after a prolonged delivery, gives birth to a child, unveiling scene by scene we watched the child grow and in no time began everyday life.  Taken to his uncle’s at the start of secondary school, the film goes on to show how Bashiru tried different handworks, together with education and finally fell in love with crude oil production and transportation.

Risky but well worth it as he caught the eye of Mrs Odeniyi, who asked him to manage her newly established filling station. He fell in love with her daughter, Bayo, played by Bimbo Ademoyr, Bashiru ended up being with her which cost him his job and reputation much later in the movie. He was accused of Cheating on her and later shifted to embezzlement which meant repaying the money and getting back to being jobless and broke. Leaving Bayo, he dated someone younger and got her pregnant.

Future scenes unveiled what the couple went through in the Pursuit for a better life briefly. From failed businesses to everything crashing, which pushed him back to his oil business, and gradually he climbed back up with a stroke of luck and miracle as his Oil business gradually boomed, he later opened a filling station and ended the movie with a happy and befitting wedding  for the bride of his youth.

The film, a real life story, produced by Toyin Abraham and directed by Biodun Stephen was not duly represented. The casting seemed poorly selected, though most likely gave their all, we could all notice minimal efforts and how poorly each role was represented. The feelings and emotions the actors should bring to life were not present, making the movie generally unrelatable and feeling a little unreal.

Being a true life story, we would be expecting it to  portray scene after scene, the everyday life of who they were representing, but no, we only watched a boy growing from childhood to adulthood with no spice and fun. Waheed, skillfully portrayed by Kola Ajeyemi was quite the commendable cast and did a great job in representing his role optimally. Generally, the cast did a poor job.

Six characters playing Bashiru at different age brackets made the character lose its feel and essence, how one second I’m feeling this passionate young man playing the lead character and in the second, I see someone else, quite disengaging.

The movie cinematography was poor, lots of jumping and poorly arranged scenes put together gave us this. The movie had lots of jumps making it generally boring. Imagine a scene where I’m beginning to understand why Young Bashiru decides to opt for his uncle’s business and in the next, we see him making inquiries about crude oil. Or how we were left in the dark with the knowledge of how Bayo reacted to her mother’s failed pla sn of getting him back. Truly disconcerting. The time lapse also would have been helpful as the film progressed. Also a few interesting action or unforgettable random childhood scenes in between his growth stages would have made it all the more interesting but sadly these were missing.

Attempting to portray the effects of support and determination, the movie only did that. It failed to properly express it. Because at many points in the film, I was convincing myself that they are simply telling a story. A stroke of luck hit him and boom, everything went so fast, it was a kind reminder why we must push and the need for a supportive partner at every turn. They generally make the journey easier and shorter no matter how exhausting it might be.

The movie is rated a 2.5. it lacked depth and spice that would make it memorable, for a real life experience, it more of gave us the feel of a poorly written script instead of the story of a young man who went from grass to grace.vv

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